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Research Results Archive

  • Refunded Emission Payments and Diffusion of NOx Abatement Technologies in Sweden
    2015/05/04

    Bonilla, J., J. Coria, K. Mohlin and T. Sterner


    Published in Ecological Economics , 116: 132-145. Doi 10.1016/j.ecolecon.2015.03.030.   

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  • Will Shale Gas Reduce Carbon Emissions from China?
    2015/05/04

    Chakravorty, U., C. Fischer and M.-H. Hubert


    Working paper, January 2015

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  • US Power Plant Carbon Standards and Clean Air And Health Co-Benefits
    2015/05/04

    Driscoll, C., J. Buonocore, J. Levy, K. Lambert, D. Burtraw, S. Reid, H. Fakhraei, J. Schwartz


    Carbon dioxide emissions standards for US power plants will influence the fuels and technologies used to generate electricity, alter emissions of pollutants such as sulphur dioxide and nitrogen oxide, and influence ambient air quality and public health. We present an analysis of how three alternative scenarios for US power plant carbon standards could change fine particulate matter and ozone concentrations in ambient air, and the resulting public health co-benefits. The results underscore that carbon standards to curb global climate change can also provide immediate local and regional health co-benefits, but the magnitude depends on the design of the standards. A stringent but flexible policy that counts demand-side energy efficiency towards compliance yields the greatest health benefits of the three scenarios analysed.Nature Climate Change  5, 535–540 (2015) doi:10.1038/nclimate2598http://www.nature.com/nclimate/journal/v5/n6/full/nclimate2598.htmlexternal link

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  • A Proximate Mirror: Greenhouse Gas Rules and Strategic Behavior under the US Clean Air Act
    2015/05/04

    Dallas Burtraw, Karen L. Palmer, Sophie Pan, Anthony Paul


    The development of climate policy in the United States mirrors international developments, with efforts to initiate a coordinated approach giving way to jurisdictions separately taking actions. The centerpiece of US policy is regulation in the electricity sector that identifies a carbon emissions rate standard (intensity standard) for each state but leaves to states the design of policies, including potentially the use of technology policies, emissions rate averaging, or cap and trade. Differences in policies among states within the same power market could promote predatory behavior resulting in a geographic shift in generation and investment in new resources. This paper examines the coordination problem using a detailed partial equilibrium model of operations and investment. We demonstrate that leading jurisdictions have available a rich set of design options that can protect them against strategic predation and, in fact, give them opportunities to proactively advance climate goals, to the economic detriment of laggards.

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  • Discussion Paper: A Microsimulation Model of the Distributional Impacts of Climate Policies
    2015/05/04

    Hal G. Gordon, Dallas Burtraw, and Roberton C. Williams III


    When a new tax on greenhouse gas emissions is imposed, a new price is introduced through a cap-and-trade program, or prices are affected by the introduction of regulation, the economic welfare of households is affected through changes in product prices, tax obligations, and changes in income. The measure of the distribution of the changes in economic welfare on households is the incidence. Measures of incidence are always important to policymakers because of their implications for equity across income, geography, age, or other characteristics. The policy we focus on in this paper is a tax on carbon emissions, but the methods and model we describe are applicable to other policies. Some taxes are designed, with varying levels of success, so that their incidence falls on those who gain from the use of the government revenue (e.g., gasoline taxes that pay for highway improvements), while others are designed to limit incidence on the poor (e.g., sales taxes that omit clothing and food). Pigouvian taxes on activities with a negative externality are often designed without the tax incidence in mind. For example, cigarette taxes have successfully reduced smoking, but their incidence has largely fallen on the poor

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  • Second-best Analysis of European Electricity Policy under Carbon Pricing
    2015/05/04

    Huebler, M., C. Fischer and O. Schenker


    Manuscript, ZEW. Zetterberg, L. (2012). Linking the Emission Trading Systems in the European Union and California. IVL report B 2061external link, opens in new window

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Updated: 2012-01-31
RESEARCH RESULTS ARCHIVE

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